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Valerio Massimo Manfredi

 

Valerio Massimo Manfredi

Valerio Massimo Manfredi
Valerio Massimo Manfredi

Valerio Massimo Manfredi was born near Modena, Italy, in 1943. He is a writer, historian, archaeologist and journalist. Married to Christine Fedderson Manfredi, he lives in a small town near Bologna with his two children. Manfredi is Professor of Classical Archaeology in the ‘Luigi Bocconi’ University of Milan and has taken part in several expeditions and excavations in Italy and abroad. He often refers to himself as an ‘Ancient World Topographer’, someone who lays bare the ancient world not only through his work as a historian and a scholar, but also brings it alive in his novels for the modern reader. Perhaps best known for his Alexander Trilogy that has been published in 36 languages in 55 countries, his many historical novels include: Lo scudo di Talos (Spartan) published in 1988, L’oracolo (The Oracle) in 1990, Le paludi di Hesperia (Heroes) in 1995, La torre della Solitudine (The Tower) in 1996, Il faraone delle sabbie (Pharaoh) in 1998, L’ultima legione (The Last Legion) in 2002, Idi di marzo (The Ides of March) and others. In 2008 his L’armata perduta (The Lost Army) won the Permio Bancarella and in 2010, Archanes the Premio Scanno. He has also recorded an audio documentary on Alexander the Great and been involved with popular TV programmes that seek to examine ancient cultures.

In the Alexander Trilogy (La Trilogia di Aléxandros), his most famous work, Manfredi traces the life of Alexander the Great from his childhood in Greece to his conquest of Persia, his expedition to India and his premature death in Babylonia. Manfredi is fascinated by the history and culture of ancient Greece and his Spartan is about two brothers whose paths cross each in unexpected ways as their story plays out in the context of Sparta’s rivalry with other Greek city states and the repeated Persian invasions of the fifth century BC. The Lost Army relates the story of the 10,000 Greek soldiers spearheading an attack on the Persian king Artaxerxes by his brother Cyrus who wishes to usurp the throne. The story is told from the point of view of Abira, a young woman, and depicts in all its dramatic detail the reality of life for the Greek soldiers after the battle is lost. In Pharaoh, Manfredi takes us back to the Jerusalem of 586 BC when the Kingdom of Judah is on the verge of destruction at the hands of the Babylonians. In his book on Roman history, The Ides of March, a political thriller, he writes about the plot to assassinate Julius Caesar.

 


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